Mufaqara Part 6: Agrarian Days

After dodging soldiers for a few days, things get a little more quiet in the village. Further down the road things are heating up in a village called Susya, but I will save that for the next entry.

For now, I have a chance to pull weeds from the vegetable garden, and watch the last parts of the grain harvest. The dry season is well advanced, some zucchini and cucumbers are coming, the sunflowers are almost ready, the tomatoes are mostly still flowering and the grain is harvested. The olives are finished being pollinated but are still very small drupes. The third house is coming along, with Sayyid and Nisham working hard on it.

The third house almost has its walls complete.The third house is progressing, after sneaking materials past the soldiers. Continue reading

Are You Hungry for Peace?

I sure am.  And what a pleasant discovery to know that Food Not Bombs has published a handbook to this effect, detailing tips and techniques for nonviolent direct action to contribute to their effort to help end war and poverty.  Of course, we know there is not singular answer to resolving these great complex questions, but a handbook with ideas for action is always a welcome tool in the struggle.

Click here to read the full Hungry for Peace book

 

Ahimsa and Food, Part 2: No birth, no death, and the extraordinary broccoli

Tonight, I returned home from the farmer’s market, having just signed up for the local CSA which has been a long-time dream of mine (which, for various circumstances and reasons, I was not able to realize until tonight). Happily chopping some fresh veggies from the market for dinner, I recalled my previous post on ahimsa (nonviolence), PeaceMeal With a Yogic Twist. I was chopping broccoli and pondered the death of the broccoli. Broccoli, thank you for giving your life to me! It will not be in vain, and I will chop you and eat you mindfully and with gratitude…

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PeaceMeal with a Yogic Twist

This weekend I facilitated a PeaceMeal workshop at the yoga studio where I teach, Yoga Oceanside. It was PeaceMeal with a yogic twist!

First we did a meditation just to get centered and become present, and in which I asked the participants to notice how hungry they were, rate it on a scale of 1-10, and to notice where they look for hunger, what kind of sensations they feel, etc. This is an activity we can do anytime with think we’re hungry – because as it turns out, just because we think we’re hungry, doesn’t mean we actually are!

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