Paying It Forward: Karma Kitchen and Seva Cafe

In a world of increasing individualism and a widely-perpetuated myth of scarcity, a wave of people and projects are recolonizing spaces to encourage service, celebrate abundance, and to foster and practise generosity.  This post was drawn from content on The Global Oneness Project, the Karma Kitchen, and the Seva Cafe websites.

Imagine a restaurant where there are no prices on the menu and where the check reads $0.00 with only this footnote: “Your meal was a gift from someone who came before you. To keep the chain of gifts alive, we invite you to pay it forward for those who dine after you.”

That’s Karma Kitchen, a volunteer-driven experiment in generosity.

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Slow Siege of Bethlehem

The following post comes from a guest contributor in Israel, observing gardening and farming in times and places of conflict.  Please feel free to post comments – this is a provocative and intriguing piece, and we welcome dialogue.
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The soldiers shuffle from side to side, trying to block our path. But there are too many of us. We walk through them like some sort of surreal slow motion charge.

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Community Peace and Food: CSAs and farmer’s markets

I have wanted to be a member of a CSA (community-supported agriculture) since I heard about the concept. But due to the nomadic, carless lifestyle I’ve chosen to lead for most of the past 10 years or so, I have never been able to do it. Finally, though, as I wrote last week, I was able to join one! Yesterday was our first day to pick-up our bountiful basket at the Mission Hills Farmers’ Market.

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The World Future Council’s Bread Tank Project

The World Future Council has created a provocative visual representation of the cost, in food, of military expenditures, with something they call the Bread Tank Project. The following information comes directly from the World Future Council’s website and facebook page The project is on display at Rio+20 until tomorrow.  

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PeaceMeal with a Yogic Twist, Part 2: Continuing with the Yamas and Niyamas

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(Photo by Kristyn Caetano of Envision Tea)

Last week I wrote about the June 10th PeaceMeal workshop I facilitated at Yoga Oceanside. Today, I’ll follow up on PeaceMeal with a Yogic Twist, continuing on the path of the yamas and niyamas, a philosophical framework that can help us to promote peace through food.

As mentioned in the previous post, the yamas (restraints) and niyamas (observances) are the first two limbs of the 8-limbed path laid out by Patanjali in the Yoga Sutras, one of the great yogic texts. The sutras are a series of short aphorisms that were initially passed down orally until Patanjali wrote them down over two thousand years ago. The yamas and niyamas essentially provide us with a guide for how to live a good life and reach our highest potential.

But what does this have to do with peace? Or food?

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Cafe Femenino

Coffee production and distribution creates great inequities and environmental harm the world over, yet it is also consumed on a daily basis by a great deal of the adult world.  This is the story of Cafe Femenino, a women’s coffee co-operative in Peru, which is striving to make positive change in the communities of its member farmers and in the lives of women at large.

Coffee<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />                         Map

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Northern Canada’s Food Insecurity

Nunavut Food Protest: Inuit Organize Widespread Protest Over Hunger And Food Costs

Feeding My Family

IQALUIT, Nunavut – A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.

A case of ginger ale: $82.

Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.

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