PeaceMeal with a Yogic Twist

This weekend I facilitated a PeaceMeal workshop at the yoga studio where I teach, Yoga Oceanside. It was PeaceMeal with a yogic twist!

First we did a meditation just to get centered and become present, and in which I asked the participants to notice how hungry they were, rate it on a scale of 1-10, and to notice where they look for hunger, what kind of sensations they feel, etc. This is an activity we can do anytime with think we’re hungry – because as it turns out, just because we think we’re hungry, doesn’t mean we actually are!

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A Poetry Picnic

Working in the Rain
by Robert Morgan

My father loved more than anything to
work outside in wet weather. Beginning
at daylight he’d go out in dripping brush
to mow or pull weeks for hog and chickens.
First his shoulders got damp and the drops from
his hat ran down his back. When even his
armpits were soaked he came in to dry out
by the fire, make coffee, read a little.
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Breaking our Food Rules

Michael Pollan’s Food Rules are a great exploration into the sets of personal codes we set up for ourselves to guide and govern our relationship and behaviours with food.  They represent ethics of our grandparents, hint at cultural values and traditions, and confer plain and simple common sense.  For example:

#19 If it came from a plant, eat it; if it was made in a plant, don’t.

#36 Don’t eat breakfast cereals that change the color of the milk.

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You Are What You Eat

Carlo Petrini, founder of the Slow Food Movement, often says, ” “Fridges are tombs – places where food goes to die.”  I tend to agree that it’s easy to forget what’s buried in the back, easy to purchase more than you need and count on the fridge to keep things fresh, and easy to go a little while without opening the door if you’re used to a busy lifestyle or a very whole foods/fresh diet.  The following post comes from Mark Menjivar, a photographer and artist based in Texas. This series of photographs was published in Good Magazine in May 2009.  It’s an interesting reflection of how the contents of our fridges reflect our careers, our lifestyles, and our personalities.  If you’re inspired by it, we welcome you to post a photograph of the contents of a fridge in response!

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Graces, Prayers, Blessings on the Meal

I’ve been recently thinking about how closely tied almost every culture is to both gratitude and peacefulness through food. This takes places through the practice of taking a pause before eating, whether to speak a grace or blessing aloud, or to quietly reflect and give thanks.

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Eating Your Way to Happiness in the Philippines

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17471626
By Kate McGeown
BBC News, Manila

Can the food in these dishes make people feel happy?

Nestled at the back of a small courtyard in the north of Manila, there is a little restaurant with an unusual name and an even more unusual concept.

It is called Van Gogh is Bipolar, in homage to the Dutch painter who is believed to have had a life-long battle with mental illness, much like the restaurant’s owner, Jetro Rafael.

Mr Rafael believes that certain foods can make you happy, and everything on the menu has been created with this in mind.

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We Knead Love

I believe to love and be loved is our most fundamental need and our highest calling in life.

Sustained love requires commitment and devotion.  Similar to the act of kneading dough, love takes effort.  At times kneading (and needing) can be frustrating.  Both dough and love can be gooey and messy.  Anyone who has ever worked with dough knows it can stick all over your fingers and to the surface on which you work.  Just as in kneading dough, love is not for the faint-hearted.  Love tests our inner strength and our emotional endurance.  Love asks for our unwavering commitment and devotion.

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