The Yoga of Food by Guest Writer Jon Mize

Today’s guest post is by Jon Mize, a yoga teacher based in Vista, CA. Jon and I recently completed our 500-hour yoga teacher training at True Nature School of Yoga in Oceanside, CA. Jon shares my passion for yoga, food, and peace, and he wrote this beautifully eloquent piece after our graduation. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!
–Stephanie ūüôā¬†

I started thinking about my Yoga practice and how it has transformed. It is no longer just an Asana practice. Now don’t get me wrong, that was my door in. I just completed my 500hr. teacher training program with the most beautiful souls one could ever encounter. It struck me, what’s next? Where do I go from here?

True Nature School of Yoga 500-hour yoga teacher training graduates
Author Jon Mize is top row, left-hand side

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Slow Siege of Bethlehem

The following post comes from a guest contributor in Israel, observing gardening and farming in times and places of conflict.  Please feel free to post comments Рthis is a provocative and intriguing piece, and we welcome dialogue.
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The soldiers shuffle from side to side, trying to block our path. But there are too many of us. We walk through them like some sort of surreal slow motion charge.

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Community Peace and Food: CSAs and farmer’s markets

I have wanted to be a member of a CSA (community-supported agriculture) since I heard about the concept. But due to the nomadic, carless lifestyle I’ve chosen to lead for most of the past 10 years or so, I have never been able to do it. Finally, though, as I wrote last week, I was able to join one! Yesterday was our first day to pick-up our bountiful basket at the Mission Hills Farmers’ Market.

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The World Future Council’s Bread Tank Project

The World Future Council¬†has created a provocative visual representation of the cost, in food, of military expenditures, with something they call the Bread Tank Project. The following information comes directly from the World Future Council’s website and facebook page.¬†¬†The project is on display at Rio+20 until tomorrow. ¬†

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PeaceMeal with a Yogic Twist, Part 2: Continuing with the Yamas and Niyamas

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(Photo by Kristyn Caetano of Envision Tea)

Last week I wrote about the June 10th PeaceMeal workshop I facilitated at Yoga Oceanside. Today, I’ll follow up on PeaceMeal with a Yogic Twist, continuing on the path of the yamas and niyamas, a philosophical framework that can help us to promote peace through food.

As mentioned in the previous post, the yamas (restraints) and niyamas (observances) are the first two limbs of the 8-limbed path laid out by Patanjali in the Yoga Sutras, one of the great yogic texts. The sutras are a series of short aphorisms that were initially passed down orally until Patanjali wrote them down over two thousand years ago. The yamas and niyamas essentially provide us with a guide for how to live a good life and reach our highest potential.

But what does this have to do with peace? Or food?

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Cafe Femenino

Coffee production and distribution creates great inequities and environmental harm the world over, yet it is also consumed on a daily basis by a great deal of the adult world. ¬†This is the story of Cafe Femenino, a women’s coffee co-operative in Peru, which is striving to make positive change in the communities of its member farmers and in the lives of women at large.

Coffee<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />                         Map

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Cosmetically-Challenged Crops

I sometimes stop and wonder, what will be the next big thing in the food movement? ¬†We’ve seen fads and trends swoop in, and certain things linger while other things fade away. ¬†There’s been intense nutritionism, focusing our desires on key chemical and nutritional components of our food (have you eaten enough vitamin B6 today? get enough iron on that vegan diet?), the no-carb, the low-carb, the low-fat, the high-protein, and every other weight loss restriction you can imagine. ¬†We’ve gone through the Canada Food Guide recommendations in school, the glycemic index standards for blood sugar consistency, the superfoods crazes (chia, hemp, and wild blueberries, oh my!), the natural and whole foods phenomena, and today, ethical standards (fair trade, local, and organic) tend to dominate the attention of foodies in the know. ¬†But, as I look around me, and read the food news, and talk to others who eat, I can’t help but think perhaps the next wave is going to be healthy and whole, but quite frankly, unconventionally beautiful. Continue reading

Online PeaceMeal Course

Beginning on August 20th 2012, the PeaceMeal Project’s co-creators Stephanie Knox Cubbon and Hannah Renglich will be convening an e-learning course¬†through the¬†National Peace Academy! ¬†It is part of the NPA’s National Peacebuilding Peacelearning Certificate Program, and can count toward the certificate’s completion.

The course is perfect for anyone wishing to explore how to build peace through food and food systems, for organizations and businesses wishing to train staff and volunteers to create a culture of peace within the workplace, and for students at any level interested in refining ideas and making clearer connections between the two vast topics.

For more information, visit our online course page, or visit the NPA site to register for this course now.

Ahimsa and Food, Part 2: No birth, no death, and the extraordinary broccoli

Tonight, I returned home from the farmer’s market, having just signed up for the local CSA which has been a long-time dream of mine (which, for various circumstances and reasons, I was not able to realize until tonight). Happily chopping some fresh veggies from the market for dinner, I recalled my previous post on ahimsa (nonviolence),¬†PeaceMeal With a Yogic Twist. I was chopping broccoli and pondered the death of the broccoli. Broccoli, thank you for giving your life to me! It will not be in vain, and I will chop you and eat you mindfully and with gratitude…

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